American History rarebooks

Published on June 1st, 2010 | by Gary DeMar

17

The History Con May be Over

The liberals got caught flat-footed in the Texas textbook wars. Texas and California drive the content of many textbooks since they have the largest public school populations. Textbook manufactures go where the money is, and less populated states can get what Texas and California decide what goes in their textbooks. It’s possible that a public (government) school in Massachusetts could get history textbooks written by whoever controls the school boards from these two distant states. But this isn’t always the case since technology has made it easier to tailor books to specific markets. Even so, liberals are going crazy and using the new Texas guidelines to clamp down on what goes into their state’s textbooks. Of course, they have to misrepresent the guidelines to accomplish their goal of further historical revisionism. Here’s an example:

“State Senator Leland Yee has introduced a bill that would require the California Board of Education to pay special attention during its textbook reviews for any of the changes approved by the Texas Board, and then report those findings to the state secretary of education and the state legislature, presumably so that those textbooks can be altered or rejected.”

What in particular is stressing many liberals like Mr. Yee (D-San Francisco)? That America’s founding fathers were “guided by Christian principles.”

I suspect that Mr. Yee has not read the Texas standards. This is not uncharacteristic of knee-jerk, ideology-driven Leftists. How many Congressmen who voted for the 2700-page healthcare bill ever read it? We have admissions from Attorney General Eric Holder(1) and Janet Napolitano (see here), head of Homeland Security, that they did not read the Arizona immigration law. Of course, this did not stop them from condemning it. The same is true for the new Texas textbook standards. How many times have you read that the standards minimize the notion of separation of church and state? Here’s what the guidelines say on the subject:

Examine the reasons the Founding Fathers protected religious freedom in America and guaranteed its free exercise by saying that Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, and compare and contrast this to the phrase “separation of church and state.”

Yee and his fellow-historical revisionists don’t want students to “compare and contrast” because they don’t want students to realize that they’ve been conned.

To make the point that liberals have little idea of even recent history when it comes to the subject of religion and America’s early founding, Texas Board of Education Member Cynthia Dunbar, a professor at Liberty University School of Law, played a game of historical “gotcha” when she delivered her invocation. It included the following:

I believe no one can read the history of our country without realizing that the Good Book and the spirit of the Savior have from the beginning been our guiding geniuses. . . . Whether we look to the first charter of Virginia . . . or to the Charter of New England . . . or to the Charter of Massachusetts Bay . . . or to the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut . . . the same objective is present: A Christian land governed by Christian principles. . . . I believe the entire Bill of Rights came into being because of the knowledge our forefathers had of the Bible and their belief in it: freedom of belief, of expression, of assembly, of petition, the dignity of the individual, the sanctity of the home, equal justice under law, and the reservation of powers to the people. . . . I like to believe we are living today in the spirit of the Christian religion. I like also to believe that as long as we do so, no great harm can come to our country.

After hearing Dunbar’s invocation (you can view it here), the left-leaning Texas Freedom Network wrote the following in response: “She offered the board’s opening prayer this morning and removed any doubt about what she and other far-right board members want students to learn: America’s laws and government should be based on the Christian Bible.” What Dunbar quoted was an excerpt of a speech that Chief Justice Earl Warren gave at the 1954 National Prayer Breakfast (for the full story, see here). Time magazine published an article about the event (see here). As reported by Time, those in attendance included President Eisenhower, Vice President Nixon (who read from John 15), Cabinet members, Congressmen, diplomats, and businessmen. It has always been the goal of liberals to keep these historical facts hidden from children. They might ask embarrassing questions.

A 1982 article in Newsweek Magazine stated, “[F]or centuries [the Bible] has exerted an unrivaled influence on American culture, politics and social life. Now historians are discovering that the Bible perhaps even more than the Constitution, is our founding document.”(2) Time magazine said something similar in 1987: “Ours is the only country deliberately founded on a good idea. That good idea combines a commitment to man’s inalienable rights with the Calvinist belief in an ultimate moral right and sinful man’s obligation to do good. These articles of faith, embodied in the Declaration of Independence and in the Constitution, literally govern our lives today.”(3) Our nation’s values were rooted in the Bible. Of course, this does not mean that all Christian Americans followed the biblical precepts that they claimed to believe, but they could not deny history.

The History Con May be Over

By Gary DeMar

The liberals got caught flat-footed in the Texas textbook wars. Texas and California drive the content of many textbooks since they have the largest public school populations. Textbook manufactures go where the money is, and less populated states can get what Texas and California decide what goes in their textbooks. It’s possible that a public (government) school in Massachusetts could get history textbooks written by whoever controls the school boards from these two distant states. But this isn’t always the case since technology has made it easier to tailor books to specific markets. Even so, liberals are going crazy and using the new Texas guidelines to clamp down on what goes into their state’s textbooks. Of course, they have to misrepresent the guidelines to accomplish their goal of further historical revisionism. Here’s an example:

“State Senator Leland Yee has introduced a bill that would require the California Board of Education to pay special attention during its textbook reviews for any of the changes approved by the Texas Board, and then report those findings to the state secretary of education and the state legislature, presumably so that those textbooks can be altered or rejected.”

What in particular is stressing many liberals like Mr. Yee (D-San Francisco)? That America’s founding fathers were “guided by Christian principles.”

I suspect that Mr. Yee has not read the Texas standards. This is not uncharacteristic of knee-jerk, ideology-driven Leftists. How many Congressmen who voted for the 2700-page healthcare bill ever read it? We have admissions from Attorney General Eric Holder(4) and Janet Napolitano (see here), head of Homeland Security, that they did not read the Arizona immigration law. Of course, this did not stop them from condemning it. The same is true for the new Texas textbook standards. How many times have you read that the standards minimize the notion of separation of church and state? Here’s what the guidelines say on the subject:

Examine the reasons the Founding Fathers protected religious freedom in America and guaranteed its free exercise by saying that Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, and compare and contrast this to the phrase “separation of church and state.”


Yee and his fellow-historical revisionists don’t want students to “compare and contrast” because they don’t want students to realize that they’ve been conned.

To make the point that liberals have little idea of even recent history when it comes to the subject of religion and America’s early founding, Texas Board of Education Member Cynthia Dunbar, a professor at Liberty University School of Law, played a game of historical “gotcha” when she delivered her invocation. It included the following:

I believe no one can read the history of our country without realizing that the Good Book and the spirit of the Savior have from the beginning been our guiding geniuses. . . . Whether we look to the first charter of Virginia . . . or to the Charter of New England . . . or to the Charter of Massachusetts Bay . . . or to the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut . . . the same objective is present: A Christian land governed by Christian principles. . . .

I believe the entire Bill of Rights came into being because of the knowledge our forefathers had of the Bible and their belief in it: freedom of belief, of expression, of assembly, of petition, the dignity of the individual, the sanctity of the home, equal justice under law, and the reservation of powers to the people. . . .

I like to believe we are living today in the spirit of the Christian religion. I like also to believe that as long as we do so, no great harm can come to our country.

After hearing Dunbar’s invocation (you can view it here), the left-leaning Texas Freedom Network wrote the following in response: “She offered the board’s opening prayer this morning and removed any doubt about what she and other far-right board members want students to learn: America’s laws and government should be based on the Christian Bible.” What Dunbar quoted was an excerpt of a speech that Chief Justice Earl Warren gave at the 1954 National Prayer Breakfast (for the full story, see here). Time magazine published an article about the event (see here). As reported by Time, those in attendance included President Eisenhower, Vice President Nixon (who read from John 15), Cabinet members, Congressmen, diplomats, and businessmen. It has always been the goal of liberals to keep these historical facts hidden from children. They might ask embarrassing questions.

A 1982 article in Newsweek Magazine stated, “[F]or centuries [the Bible] has exerted an unrivaled influence on American culture, politics and social life. Now historians are discovering that the Bible perhaps even more than the Constitution, is our founding document.”(5) Time magazine said something similar in 1987: “Ours is the only country deliberately founded on a good idea. That good idea combines a commitment to man’s inalienable rights with the Calvinist belief in an ultimate moral right and sinful man’s obligation to do good. These articles of faith, embodied in the Declaration of Independence and in the Constitution, literally govern our lives today.”(6) Our nation’s values were rooted in the Bible. Of course, this does not mean that all Christian Americans followed the biblical precepts that they claimed to believe, but they could not deny history.

Endnotes:

  1. Attorney General Eric H. Holder admitted to a congressional committee that he had not read the 10 pages of SB 1070: “I’ve just expressed concerns on the basis of what I’ve heard about the law. But I’m not in a position to say at this point, not having read the law, not having had the chance to interact with people are doing the review, exactly what my position is.”()
  2. Kenneth L. Woodward, “How the Bible made America,” Newsweek (December 27, 1982), 44.()
  3. Time (May 25, 1987).()
  4. Attorney General Eric H. Holder admitted to a congressional committee that he had not read the 10 pages of SB 1070: I’ve just expressed concerns on the basis of what I’ve heard about the law. But I’m not in a position to say at this point, not having read the law, not having had the chance to interact with people are doing the review, exactly what my position is.”()
  5. Kenneth L. Woodward, “How the Bible made America,” Newsweek (December 27, 1982), 44.()
  6. Time (May 25, 1987).()
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About the Author

Gary is a graduate of Western Michigan University (1973) and earned his M.Div. at Reformed Theological Seminary in 1979. He is the author of countless essays, news articles, and more than 27 book titles, His most recent book is Exposing the Real Last Days Scoffers. Gary lives in Marietta, Georgia, with his wife, Carol. They have two married sons and four grandchildren, Gary and Carol are members of Midway Presbyterian Church (PCA).



17 Responses to The History Con May be Over

  1. Brian says:

    This is all well and good, but the mere suggestion that this trivial piece of supposed "good" news will have any bearing on the already defunct and decrepit public school system is absurd. The system is broken beyond repair and the textbook companies that print the garbage our students read are nothing more than an additional burden on the country's financial mess. It's amazing to me that liberals see this situation as a loss and even more incredible that conservatives view this as a victory. And with this false hope, more time and money will go into keeping the public school system afloat instead of just allowing it to fail to be replaced by homeschooling and private education.

  2. From the perspective of the Left, Truth equals hate and hate equals truth. When you speak the Truth on a subject, they will accuse you of hate, and when they spew hatred at you, they will claim that they are only telling the truth. Paul admonishes us to “preach the word” and to “reprove, rebuke, and exhort”. Jesus tells us, “Blessed are you when others revile you and persecute you and utter all kinds of evil against you falsely on my account. Rejoice and be glad, for your reward is great in heaven, for so they persecuted the prophets who were before you.”

    Keep it up, Gary. Don’t back down.

  3. msusapatriot says:

    You want to know the reason you are not allowed to climb the stairs in the Washington Monument anymore. You would see that each step is engraved the a passage from Proverbs. Thus proving he was a Christian man and saw God's hand in everything he did.

  4. Gary DeMar says:

    Nathan, I've dealt with Franklin, Jefferson, Adams, and Paine, none of whom were atheists. The Left is anti-religious, and generally textbooks present American history this way. The Left would no more accept the views of Franklin, et al. than they would an orthodox Christian. Also, the founding of America did not begin in 1776. You can't read Franklin's comments at the Constitutional Convention and claim that they are deistic. There is a long history of Christian history before the drafting of the Constitution, remnants of which are in the document (Art I, sec. 7 and "Done in the Year of our Lord"). I suggest that you take a look at the original colonial charters and the later state Constitutions.

    Actually, in the article I wrote, I cited what Texas Board of Education Member Cynthia Dunbar quoted, the words of a Supreme Court Justice and the reaction of the usual suspects on the Left. They did not know that they were the words of Earl Warren.

  5. freedom fighter says:

    We continue to have our rights systematically stripped by these power mad socialists.

  6. Peggy says:

    This argument that is ongoing is a perfect picture of the result of teaching history that has been changed to suit the environment of the intellectuals. In order to settle it, all that must be done is a bit of study of original documents. The truth will rise to the top in spite of the efforts of many years of trying to remove it. The God who established this nation is the sam God who inspired the founders and the same God of today. Dennis's remarks earlier reveal the fact that he is familiar somewhat with Thomas Paine's later writings,not the ones that helped shape the founding era. Any history book or writing that does not footnote its work with original source documents is not worth the paper it is opined upon. Even the Texas textbook wars show to me that the God who established us is still at work today. He just has more people that have been educated in untruths that have been taught for over 100 years. The humility of the early scholars has been replaced by incredible pride……everyone should know what pride precedes!

  7. Nathan says:

    I'm a little worried about this as well…

    For the record, I believe firmly that many knee-jerk Liberals are trying to destroy these texts without reading them. But I've seen many knee-jerk Conservatives trying to save them without reading them either…and I think Mr. Demar may be one of them.

    Sir, you quote guidelines, but not the text itself. In general support of the idea that the Founding Fathers based this country on Christian principles, you quote…Time, Newsweek, and Chief Justice Warren. Not good enough for me, sir…once you explain how Jefferson was replaced with Aquinas (in textbook discussions), how the Fathers believed that the standing US Army was one of the Revolution's greatest accomplishments (they did not, at all), and how you get away with ignoring and/or eliminating all references to Jefferson's and Franklin's Deistic beliefs in these textbooks, then I'll give you some attention.

    I'm all for eliminating the inaccuracies of the Left in textbooks. But the Right response shouldn't be more inaccuracy.

    • Mike says:

      Well Nathan. How about if we hold of on destroying these books until someone does read them. On the other hand, I would rather have the Conservatives lies over the Liberal lies. At least it's Pro America and it's Constitution. Let's not destroy them………..at least not yet. I think we can agree to that don't you.

      • Matt says:

        The idea that you'd prefer to have conservative lies over liberal lies is perhaps one of the most ill-considered things I have ever heard. A lie inherently has an intent to deceive. How on earth is a conservative government lying better, even if the lie is purportedly pro-America or pro-Constitution? We should strive to eliminate all inaccuracies from our textbooks. Yes the founding fathers were rhetorically religious. However, putting their statements in historical context they were closer to Enlightenment philosophers (often blamed by conservative Christians for destroying the supremacy of the church and morality) with a religious spin to appeal to the people of the day. I have no doubt many of the founding fathers were legitimate Christians, but simply because they were does not mean that was the primary reasoning behind all the values our nation has developed. Sorry to ramble :).

  8. Dennis says:

    I think people better pay a little closer attention to history.It is true the puritans that came here were christians with christian principles but 150 years later give or take our known founding fathers and the revolutionaries were not.Read there own words and letters and what they REALLY thought and felt.Look at Thomas Pain for example.They actually believed Jesus was not divine was in fact illigitimate.They rejected all supernatural events of the bible.They in fact were the spirit of ANTICHRIST.Before you scoff or attack look into it for yourselves.it is time people actually really wake up and look whats going on around them.

    • lewsta says:

      Read "the lives of the signers of the Declaration of Independence", written back about 1850 or so…. reprints are out there. Two of them could arguably be deists, but recognise and support the concept that it is the christian bible that is the root of our founding documents. ALL the others are solid christians of one persuasion or another, again, all of them upholding the foundational truth of the christian bible. William Blackstone and his writings, well preceeding the forming of our Constitution, are the single most-referred source for our framework. Guess what? HE bases all his writing and principles on the biblical standards.

      Thomas Paine does not constitute the sum of our framers.. he is but one. cite the others as well…. the overwhelming majority were bible-believeing christians, and carefully crafted this nations founding structure on the basis of the bible's teaching.

    • Keith Breedlove says:

      Read David Barton's "Original Intent." He quotes the Founders quite heavily, including what they thought of Thomas Paine after the revolution. It's obvious that they did not believe as you state, but were quite religious and very Christian. I suggest that you take your own advice.

    • AJB46GAP says:

      Paine, Jefferson and Franklin were influence by notables of the Age of Enlightenment, Voltaire (Deist, because the old man become tired of the arguments between the different churches) and Montesquieu (Republic Government).

      The God who gave us life, gave us liberty at the same time. -Jefferson
      Rebellion against tyrants is obedience to God. -Franklin
      The right to freedom being the gift of Almighty God, it is not in the power of man to alienate this gift and voluntarily become a slave. -Samuel Adams
      If then Christianity is the first and greatest blessing, and the political and civil laws the second, there are no political or civil laws in any state that can or ought to hinder the entrance of the Christian religion. -Montesquieu
      Thus, the preamble to the Constitutions of the 50 States include God: Virginia 1776, Bill of Rights, XVI Religion, or the Duty which we owe our Creator can be directed only by Reason and that it is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian Forbearance, Love and Charity towards each other.
      Notice not to be a Christian but to practice, Love and Charity.
      Link to info of Religious affiliations of our Founders: http://www.adherents.com/gov/Founding_Fathers_Rel

  9. shannonc2 says:

    Rock on my sister, The truth will always be the truth and evil will always be evil, and I will stand for my God, my country and the people. Thereal history of this country is being retaught, I love it. Thank you BHO, for waking us up. Stand back because we are coming to take back our country. The more I know about the left, the harder I am fighting. I will not allow the left to piss on the graves of all the great men and women who gave all for us. From my cold dead hands, BRING IT ON. AMERICAN FREEDOM FIGHTER SHANNON CLARK

  10. pink pony says:

    Professor Cynthia Dunbar, an excellent and courageous invocation, may God Bless you and stand by all Christians to uphold the true history of our great country. God Bless America

  11. Conservadiva says:

    Oh, professor Cynthia Dunbar, how refreshing! An excellent choice to quote Chief Justice Earl Warren. There is a great deal of ignorance on the left, and perhaps purposely so. However, we conservatives need to dust off our history books as well. And make sure your children know their history. It is needed for such a time as this.

  12. Dr. Wm. J. Hurst says:

    I was brought up in Canada. My impression at that time, was that we studied more American History, than the American's that came to visit. About 1/2 of our history was American and the rest Canadian and World during those years.

    The Christian roots of the country were clear when they were taught, even in public schools. Oh how have the mighty fallen.

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